Close
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Member fern5407's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Pembroke Pines
    Posts
    58

    Branch
    Air Force
    Status
    I Served
    Served
    1982 to 1988

    Near:
    Eglin AFB

    USAF First Aid for motorcyclist in need - Knowing What To Do In Case Of An Emergency

    Very good and informative article from Motorcyclist magazine

    Motorcycle Riding Emergency Tips - First Aid
    Knowing What To Do In Case Of An Emergency Can Make All The Difference
    By Greg Mcquide



    Think quick: Your buddy just crashed and now he's bleeding. Or unconscious. Or both. And you're not sure if he's breathing anymore. Do you know what to do? If it's just you and him and 20 miles of empty road, possessing the right knowledge means you don't have to sit helpless until the ambulance arrives. And while none of the information presented here can take the place of proper medical training, it might just save his life.

    The Neck
    For the record, your spinal cord is like overcooked asparagus in terms of consistency. Nerve tissue is soft, bones are hard, and if the neck is broken, the slightest wrong movement could sever the spinal cord and render catastrophic damage. Our medical expert told us to use the "highest index of suspicion" possible in regard to neck injuries. Your buddy's condition could be salvageable, but because you moved him incorrectly, he could die or become permanently paralyzed. Caution is the key: If your friend is unconscious, or complains of pain and numbness in the neck, shoulders or down the arms or legs, you could be dealing with an unstable neck fracture. So, unless he's in immediate danger (i.e., in the middle of a burning wreck, etc.) do not move the victim and unless he's stopped breathing do not-repeat-do not remove his helmet. It is much better to be on the safe side.

    One-Minute Trauma Check
    Primum non nocere, says our medical expert: "First do no harm." Acting too rashly when you first arrive at an accident scene can make a bad situation worse. First: Call an ambulance. Then, take a step back, breathe and do a one-minute trauma check: (1) Until you can assess his condition-or unless he's in immediate danger-don't move the victim; (2) Ask what happened-this will give you important information, and a person's lucidity (or lack thereof) will tell you a lot about his condition; (3) Ask about/check the neck-be very suspicious of any pain or numbness; (4) Check the head and chest for injuries; (5) Check the abdomen for tenderness or tightness-either one could mean internal injuries; (6) Gently squeeze each limb and check for sprains or breaks. Begin proper treatment if you're able-and never move a victim with a potential neck injury. Even transporting a person with a broken arm or leg by bike could be dangerous.

    Be Prepared
    Proper protection is crucial (remember, prevention can be the best medicine), so buy the best helmet, gloves, boots and armored jacket/suit you can afford. Buy a cell phone (get a dual-band unit for the best coverage) and pack a good first aid kit that includes adhesive and elastic bandages, disinfectants, gauze pads, a wire splint and antibiotic ointment. And riding with a friend (in case you need help) is always a good idea.

    Road Rash
    The dreaded "raspberry" is one of the most common (and painful) motorcycle ailments-even more so for those who choose to ride only in shorts and a tank top. First step? As soon as possible, wash the wound with soap and running water. (Trying to pick out the dirt before washing only helps infection.) If washing is too painful, try numbing the area first with ice. Squirt an antibiotic solution on the wound (our doc suggests Betadine) and then pick as much of the dirt/rocks/etc. out of the skin as you can. (A sharp sterile needle or pin works best.) Wash the wound again, apply more Betadine and antiseptic ointment (such as Neosporine), then dress the area with nonstick gauze and a bandage. Not a painless procedure.

    CPR/Mouth-To-Mouth
    There might be nothing scarier than finding that your buddy's heart and/or breathing has stopped, and we'd be lying if we said we could teach you mouth-to-mouth resuscitation or Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) in this small space. Take a course and learn how to do it correctly. Before administering mouth-to-mouth, take care not to hyperextend the neck-move the jaw forward to get an open airway. Clear out any blockages, pinch his nose shut and form a tight seal between your mouth and his. Blow until his chest rises, pull away and repeat once his chest falls down again. For CPR, kneel to the victim's side, place the heel of one hand on his breastbone and lay your other hand over the top. Interlock the fingers and compress his chest about two inches, keeping your arms locked straight. Aim for about 100 compressions a minute, and-since his heart has stopped, he won't be breathing-give two mouth-to-mouth breaths every 15 compressions. Again, this is not a substitute for proper training; taking a course will allow you to practice on mannequins under expert supervision.

    Shock
    A potentially fatal condition: Medical texts define shock as "a profound depression of the vital processes associated with reduced blood volume/pressure and caused usually by severe injuries, hemorrhage or burns." In other words, the victim's body starts to shut itself down, usually due to a massive internal/external blood loss or damage to the nervous system. Get any bleeding under control as quickly as possible and watch your buddy for weakness, pale and clammy skin, shallow breathing, (unusual) dementia, rapid and weak pulse or loss of consciousness. You'll want to try to get blood back into his brain by laying him down and raising his feet. Keep his body temperature up by covering him with a blanket/sleeping bag/riding jacket, etc. Shock can be a deteriorating condition, so even if your buddy seems fine right after the accident, keeping a close eye on him is worthwhile.

    Heat Exhaustion/Stroke
    Ride out in hot, humid conditions long enough without rest or proper fluid intake and heat exhaustion can set in; your buddy will be pale, lethargic, sweating profusely, cramping up, nauseous, etc. Get him into the shade, get him cool (use a wet cloth or ice pack), hide the nurse and slowly give him some water to drink. Heat stroke-wherein the temperature-regulation center of the brain stops working and you begin to fry in your own juices-is much more serious. Sweating stops, the skin becomes hot and dry, and the victim may even collapse and fall into a coma. In this case, you need to cool your buddy down by any means possible, and be prepared for mouth-to-mouth resuscitation should he stop breathing. By now, taking water by the mouth won't help enough-the victim will have to be rehydrated by intravenous fluids in a hospital.

    Gimme A Break...
    You'd think that with 206 bones in the body, you'd be allowed to snap more than one before things get serious. Ouch. Basically, dealing with fractures depends on immobilization and proper splinting of the injury itself. A splint's job is to imitate the supporting function of the bone-you can use a thick newspaper, wire, a couple pieces of wood, etc. Arrange the splint around the fracture (don't attempt to straighten a twisted limb) and secure it with an elastic bandage. Immobilize the injury as best you can (use a sling for a broken arm) and wait for the ambulance. You can't really splint a busted clavicle (collarbone), so you'll want to sling the arm on the injured side and wrap a bandage around the upper arm and chest to keep the whole affair from moving.

    Bleeding
    "One way or the other," our medical expert tells us, "all bleeding will stop. It's up to you to determine if that's now or later." Direct pressure on the wound is the key-use gauze or, barring that, a clean T-shirt or rag. (Forget about a tourniquet-you'll most likely do more harm than good.) If moving the victim won't cause further harm, lay him down and elevate the injury above the heart. Apply a bandage once the bleeding slows. If the gauze or rag you're using soaks through, keep applying pressure by placing a clean rag directly over the old one-although if your buddy's bleeding enough to sop a T-shirt or two, he'll probably go into shock. Have you called for an ambulance yet?

    What else?
    Get Proper Training...Now!If you think that we've told you all you need to know, then you're sadly mistaken. And even a book as humorous and informative as dr. flash gordon's Blood, Sweat & Gears: Ramblings on Motorcycling and Medicine ($12.95 from Whitehorse Press: 800/531-1133 or www. whitehorsepress.com) couldn't possibly be a substitute for phoning your local Red Cross and signing up for courses in First Aid and CPR. Do it. (Our thanks to dr. gordon for his good counsel; visit him at www.docflash.com.)
    Juan C Fernandez
    USAF 1982 - 1988
    Hooyah

  2. #2
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1


    Juan,
    awesome job!! This is really a good idea to post. Unfortunately, most individuals without training will pretty much freeze up in an emergency. So, that said....get training! Go get your CPR, your BLS, your AED, whatever you can find to make yourself useful in an accident or crash. You NEVER know when you might need it. I hope you never do, but just in case.........
    I'm taking EMT classes now, and one of our instructors said that in Seattle, you cannot get your DL without producing your current CPR card. Sweet!!!! And she said every spring, the Red Cross offers it free to all takers.
    Sharon

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Elizabethtown
    Posts
    333

    Branch
    Army Reserves
    Status
    I Served
    Served
    1988 to Present

    Near:
    Fort Knox
    very good and usefull info thanks for posting
    " There is no excuse to go about your business in a half-hearted way. We are only alive for a finite number of days, and we're poorer for every hour that we spend in soft-hearted pursuits."

    Dino

  4. #4
    Senior Member  The First 100 S.E.R.E.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Oceanside
    Posts
    163

    Branch
    Air Force
    Status
    I Retired
    Served
    1967 to 1988

    Near:
    Camp Pendleton
    Nicely put. Great advice. Printing this out and giving it to everyone that rides should be done.

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Temecula
    Posts
    1

    Status
    I Retired
    Served
    1990 to 2010

    Near:
    Camp Pendleton
    Great Info.

    * - when treating for shock, keep the victim warm. If they are bleeding and lying on the ground, they are susceptible to hypothermia even in warm weather.
    * - Elevating the victims lower extremities does absolutely nothing for them. There are no medical studies that substantiate this, it's nonsense we have been passing around for years, since Boy Scout 1st aid classes.
    * - I would strongly recommend keeping a Tourniquet on your bike with a 1st Aid kit. Extremity injuries are common in motorcycle accidents. No one should ever bleed to death from an extremity injury. Military medicine has proven TK's to be safe for 111 minutes. Placing a TK does not sentence the victim to losing a limb, that's an antiquated philosophy.
    * - Although CPR is the appropriate action for a pulse less casualty, keep in mind that CPR will do nothing for a trauma patient that has bled out. There must be blood in the circulatory system in order for chest compressions to be effective.

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    FRANKLIN
    Posts
    2

    Branch
    Army
    Status
    I Served
    Served
    1974 to 1981

    Near:
    Fort Campbell
    Thanks for the information. I am in the process of trying to get this training for my fellow riders with the Legion Post I ride with. Thanks for sharing.

  7. #7
    AGMC Long Rider
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Clarksville
    Posts
    7

    Branch
    Army
    Status
    I Retired
    Served
    1975 to 1995

    Near:
    Fort Campbell
    Fellow baggers, put together a small trama kit and carry it with you! No, don't go buy a drugstore first aid kit with a bunch of "ouchie" bandaids and Tylenol and call it a day. You need tourniquets (suggest more than one, and the one-handed type), Quickclot, large gauze wraps, the type of supplies needed to treat massive injuries - and that the service taught us about. We should be able to spare a little room "just in case." Who knows, the life you save may be your own!

  8. #8
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Lake Butler
    Posts
    3

    Status
    I Served
    Served
    1991 to 1994

    Near:
    NAS Jacksonville
    This is great information. I'm printing it out and will share with my friends. Thank you.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •